Malaysian Actress Zarina Ann Julie Nude Sex Photo Scandal

ZarinaAn-Julie, 21, as anyone who’s fond of Malaysian soap knows, is the lead of the drama Anak Pontianak. She has already apologized to her fans for these sex pictures, insisting that those were taken when she wasn’t yet a celebrity, and that (in words that echo those of Gillian Chung’s) she was just being naive, like any silly teenaged girl but that is after she lied by saying the photos were superimposed. The hot and scandalous Zarina An-Julie sex pictures were taken for private use but it seems that her boyfriend wanted to share the photos with his friends and they share it with the world. Below are some pictures that have been circulating on the Internet of a hot Malaysian TV3 actress being a slut for her man’s camera. Zarina An-Julie, a.k.a. Anju plays Mia on Anak Pontianak and she has many nude pics circulating on the internet. Below she is naked and having friend with her boyfriend and showing off her 21 year old boobs. Here are her skanky swimsuit pictures that were posted last week. Please send me more naked pictures of this girl atsubmit@GutterUncensored.com, I want to post them all. Click on pictures to enlarge.

Zarina Ann Julie of the Anak Pontianak movie fame is embroiled in a sex scandal in Malaysia. The alleged photos of her in uncompromising position with her boy friend has recently been circulated on the internet. Zarina Ann Julie vehemently denies that the pictures are hers or her boyfriend. She claims that the photos are ‘doctored’ or ’superimposed‘.




In Saudi Arabia, for example, compensation for a Muslim man is greater than that for a Muslim woman, which is greater than that for a Christian woman, which in turn is more than that for a Hindu man. Conversely, in Yemen, the compensation for a Jew is greater than that for a Muslim, on account of the former’s status as a protected member of the tribe. In Iran, compensation is not necessary for victims whose blood is considered mobah, or able to be spilled with impunity, such as members of the Baha’i community.
Can there be equal treatment?
Even if we were to accept uncontested the notion of the quantifiability of human life in cash terms, it is clear that there is a strong possibility for equality before the law to be compromised under such a system. The fact that we already bear witness to unaddressed inequalities in Malaysia, borne by adherence to some notion or other of ethno-religious supremacy, reflects badly on the prospect for equal treatment should qisas be implemented.
Above all, we must consider how guilt and innocence are determined in syariah law. The existing literature is not encouraging.
Human Rights Watch issued a report in 1999 detailing a case in Pakistan involving a man who murdered his wife’s lover upon finding them in a “compromising position”. In this instance, it was ruled that, as men were the “guardians of women” (according to Surah An-Nisa, 34), the jealous husband had merely been “protecting his property” when he killed the cuckolding man. It was accordingly adjudged a case of self-defense and no punishment, not even diyya, was levied upon the husband, who was declared innocent. The deceased victim, on the other hand, was deemed guilty by virtue of his complicity in adultery.
That the system of beliefs these moral justifications are based on is not one all Malaysians subscribe to merely compounds the problem. Apologists will, at this point, trot out the well-worn argument that syariah laws only apply to Muslims and not to non-Muslims, and therefore its wholesale implementation should not be of concern to non-Muslims.
That line of reasoning is a poor one. More than one-third of Malaysians are non-Muslims who live cheek by jowl with their Muslim countrymen and women, and sooner or later a non-Muslim will perpetrate a crime against a Muslim or vice-versa.
When this comes to pass, one of two things will happen, both of which are contrary to the purportedly exclusive nature of syariah. Either non-Muslims will be treated differently, in which case we go back to the problem of legal parity, or they will be treated identically, which would necessarily require the imposition of Islamic law on non-Muslims. There is no such thing as compartmentalised law in a multi-cultural society, regardless of what PAS would have us believe.
Hudud is thus only a small symptom of a much larger predicament. What is truly at stake here are the very notions of universal equality and justice. One hopes the majority holds these things dear. Favicon

Yow Hong Chieh holds a BA and and would like to see the gates ofitjihadreopened.

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